AddLab

Penn’s School of Engineering and Applied Science recently opened the AddLab, a new facility that houses a suite of state-of-the-art 3-D printing tools that help turn the creations of engineers’ dreams into reality.

Penn’s School of Engineering and Applied Science recently opened the AddLab, a new facility that houses a suite of state-of-the-art 3-D printing tools that help turn the creations of engineers’ dreams into reality.

AddLab

But the AddLab is not solely a resource for professional engineers. The team and facilities are available for Penn faculty, staff, and students to help 3-D printed materials become more accessible while cutting down on the cost and time associated with external vendors.

In this edition of By The Numbers, the Current peers into the inner-workings of the AddLab and the creations, big and small, its team produces.

16Total number of 3-D printers in the AddLab. The various printers use technologies such as material extrusion, vat photopolymerization, and material jetting to create objects.
8Number of MakerBot Replicator 2 printers available for use by students in “Introduction to Mechanical Design” and other mechanical engineering courses.
75Approximate size, in micrometers, of the smallest features created at the AddLab, about the width of an average human hair.
30Number of labs and courses that the AddLab has collaborated with over the past year.
16Number of student workers who help operate and maintain the equipment in the AddLab. They also train new users and work with researchers to design parts that are ready to print.
1,000Maximum size, in cubic inches, of the products that can be built at the AddLab. However, most parts are much smaller—usually closer to 3.9 cubic inches.
3,000Approximate number of minutes required to build some of the AddLab’s most ambitious parts. Some of these large parts are used on RC submarines, robots, and electric racecars.

Originally published on .