Hey Day history

For nearly 100 years, Penn juniors have celebrated Hey Day, the event that marks the “moving up” of juniors to the senior class.

For nearly 100 years, Penn juniors have celebrated Hey Day, the event that marks the “moving up” of juniors to the senior class.

Photo by Scott Spitzer

Today, the event has four major components: the march of the junior class from the Junior Balcony in the Quad to College Green, the official proclamation of the class as seniors from Penn President Amy Gutmann, a picnic on 40th Street Field, and the sporting of fake straw hats, red T-shirts, and canes.

In this edition of By The Numbers, the Current explores the history and traditions of Hey Day.

1916Year the event that marked the rising of juniors was officially dubbed “Hey Day.”
1,000Number of signatures a student petition garnered to advocate for the return of Hey Day in 1940, which was abolished earlier that year due to lack of interest. The petition worked, and the old custom was revived.
75Cost, in cents, of the canes seniors carried in 1949, described as “black dress type with curved tops and silver bands.”
6Number of years following the passage of the 19th Amendment, which granted women suffrage, until a women’s Hey Day was introduced in 1926.
1Number of Hey Days celebrated in 1968, when the men’s and women’s events were combined into a single ceremony for the first time.
2,403Number of juniors at Penn who made the move to the senior class during Hey Day 2014.
2,580Number of seniors who graduated in 2014, passing the torch to the Class of 2015.

Originally published on .